CLICK HERE TO BUY T-SHIRTS, TOTE BAGS, ETC.:

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Four Brand-New Stencils Released Today at StencilGirl.com!


Happy to announce today's debut of four new stencils -- all of which appear here.

This post will showcase art samples made with the first of them -- s522 Medallion --











My next post will introduce the second of my four brand-new stencils -- s523 Sprigs.

Below is a sneak-peek at another new stencil -- part of  9" x 12" Thistles -- on a background printed with part of Prayer Flags stencil (also 9" x 12".)


Above:  a greeting card cover collaged with a partial print that was made with (background) 9" x 12" Prayer Flags Stencil and (foreground) 9" x 12" Thistle Stencil.



9" x 12" Prayer Flags, an older stencil

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

More Collages Made with Original Drawings for Stencils


During the summer just ended, I had the pleasure of taking an online art class under Jane Davies that focused on black-and-white art.

For some of her weekly exercises, I created collages using cut-outs from drawings I had previously developed; drawings that had become stencils.


Above:  Anyone familiar with my 9" x 12" stencil Loopy Ladders will recognize which part of this collage came from my original drawing.  Hint:  the original drawing was done with black pen on white paper.  But in the final stages of developing the stencil, I reversed blacks with whites.  So the stencil itself looks like this --



Loopy Ladders


Below is a collage that includes a leaf cut from my original drawing for my 9" x 12" stencil Clustered Leaves. 



Again, the cut-out above is color-reversed from the stencil itself, which looks like this --



Clustered Leaves

To see all my stencils, please visit here.

If you'd like to subscribe to this blog via email, just fill out that option in the upper right sidebar.

Thanks for your visit here today!


Sunday, October 8, 2017

Small-Art Focus on SASSY SPRAY and other StencilGirl Stencils


Check here for a step-by-step demo first shown in StencilGirl Talk.  

Below are just a few of the photos taken by artist Louise Nelson 
as she went thru the steps of this project, developing Artist Trading Cards and other small artworks.






My thanks to Louise for having chosen -- along with other StencilGirl stencils -- my 6" x 6" stencil Sassy Spray.

To see my complete collection of stencils, please visit here.

Thank you for taking time to visit my blog today!  If interested in subscribing by email, please use that option in the upper right sidebar.


Thursday, October 5, 2017

Black and White Collages made with Stencil Prints


This past summer I had the fun experience of taking an online class with Jane Davies, a class focused on black and white art.

Collage was the topic of one of our lessons.  Below are some of the collages I created for that class.  You can click on any of these images for enlargement, to better see details.

Above:  in the center of this piece is part of my original drawing that became the 9" x 12" stencil Clustered Leaves.  On the far left, a very small piece was made with my 6" x 6" stencil Links.

Above:  In the upper central area of this collage, I used a piece of the drawing I did when designing the 9" x 12" stencil Loopy Ladders.

Above:  The central and largest piece in this collage was made with my 6" x 6" stencil Sassy Spray.

Above:  In the upper right and again in the central right are two pieces made with my 6" x 6" stencil Links.  In the lower left is a collage piece made with my 9" x 12" stencil Blooming Where Planted.

Above:  The central collage element was made with my 6" x 6" stencil Palm Fronds Silhouette Small.  (There is a Mini version measuring 4" x 4".)

Above:  Again -- this time in the upper right, as well as in the central area -- I used collage elements printed with my 6" x 6" stencil Palm Fronds Silhouette Small.  The central area is dominated by a heart-shaped cut-out from a print made with Blooming Where Planted.  And in the upper left is a sliver of paper made with Sassy Spray.

These stencils in their entirety are shown below:


Sassy Spray

Palm Fronds Silhouette Small
Links

Blooming Where Planted

Loopy Ladders
Clustered Leaves


Thanks for visiting my blog today!  To follow by email, use this option in the upper right sidebar.

To see all my stencils, please visit here.

Monday, October 2, 2017

MIMOSA 9" x 12" Stencil and Texture Paint for Making Gelli Plate Prints


For today's project, I first used masking tape to secure my 9"X 12" stencil Mimosa to a sheet of previously painted newsprint. 



Then I began to outline the design with a watercolor pencil --


The above close-up shows the blue outlines as they are being drawn around each part of the design, by tracing the open edges of the stencil.


Above: The stencil has been removed; the watercolor pencil lines remain.




Above:  Using squeeze-bottle texture paint, I've begun to trace the penciled-in lines.  

Above:  The textured outlines have been completed
I waited for the texture paint to fully dry.

My next step was to start printing with my Gelli Plate (I used the 12" X 14" plate since my large Mimosa stencil measures 9"X 12".) 


With a brayer, I spread open acrylic paint over the plate, then pressed the textured paper face-down onto the wet paint.  When I pulled the paper up, it had collected some of the paint, and it had left an imprint.

I pulled one - two prints from the imprinted surface of the Gelli Plate, then repeated the process several times with new layers of paint, continuing until I had pulled a number of prints.

Having previously used the Gelli Plate with the Mimosa stencil itself -- not an outlined version created from the stencil -- I could immediately see the difference between the two in terms of results.  I'm pleased with the results I've achieved both the original way -- using the stencil itself -- and this new way.


 Two of the "new-way" prints are shown below.







To show a comparison with the "old-way" Gelli Plate prints, created by using the stencil itself instead of a texture-outlined version, I'll include the images below --





(To explain what I mean by "the old way," I'm talking about brayering the Gelli Plate print with open acrylic, then placing the original stencil onto the plate.  The stencil is then lifted, leaving its imprint on the plate.  Next, a sheet of paper is pressed onto the plate, and pulled.  The above two images were achieved this way.)

Last but not least, here is the paper I had treated with texture paint.  This is how it appears now that it has been used multiple times with the Gelli Plate.  It was a tool, but now it's artwork itself:






Thanks for visiting my blog today!  To follow by email, just check out the option in the upper right sidebar.

To see my full line of stencils, please visit here.

Saturday, September 30, 2017

9" x 12" Stencil TANGLED PODS used in Dimensional Stenciling


For this project, I used my 9" x 12" stencil Tangled Pods ...



... along with matte gel mediuma spreading tool, masking tape, a soft terrycloth rag and a sturdy substrate -- in this case, I chose a large sheet of glossy cardstock that had already been monoprinted with blue and green acrylic paints, then had been used as a "catch-all paper" when I'd painted another paper orange.





After taping the substrate to my work surface, I covered it with my Tangled Pods stencil and taped that down, too. 




For my next step, I spread a generous layer of matte gel medium across the top of the stencil, as shown in the two photos below.  (I could have used gloss gel medium; in this process, either will work.)







After spreading the gel medium, I lifted off the stencil.  See below--




At this point, I set aside the artwork to dry.  (I cleaned the stencil immediately.)  Since I'd used matte medium, I knew that when the gel became nearly transparent, it would be dry.

Once the surface had dried, I began to coat it with acrylic paints, first brushing them on, then using the soft rag to wipe away paint from selected areas.






The photos above show the starting stages.  I went on to add layer after layer of paint, repeating the process, over and over.

The final piece is shown below.  One of its layers was a metallic paint, which I used over about 2/3 of the surface:




Thanks for visiting my blog today!  To follow by email, just check out the option in the upper right sidebar.

To see my full line of stencils, please visit here.