CLICK HERE TO BUY T-SHIRTS, TOTE BAGS, ETC.:

Monday, August 31, 2015

Unique Twist on Using Stencils


The first image here is a greeting card cover ...


And the second image is the stencil I used ...

KALEID
 The process was simple:  I held the stencil up next to a window, positioning it so that sunlight cast a pattern thru the stencil and onto a sheet of green paper that I had secured nearby.  This stretched the stencil's design into an angle that interested me.  I snapped a photo, printed it, and used it as a greeting card cover -- embellishing it with a curl of glitter in the upper left corner.

Friday, August 28, 2015

Drop Me a Line ...



...or draw me one.  And make it 3-dimensional!

 The 2 greeting cards below were created in several steps, using my new 9"X12" stencil Prayer Flags.  The cards were created on 6"X6" greeting cards blanks cut from dark bronze cardstock (available at www.jampaper.com.)     


Click on the above image to better see the 3D lines -- yellow on the left card cover and copper on the right card cover.

First, I  used masking tape to secure the stencil Prayer Flags into place over the covers of the 2 greeting cards. Clicking on the photo below to enlarge it, you can see that I'd lined up the greeting card blanks, side-by-side.  This way, I can use 1 stencil to do the groundwork for 2 cards -- at the same time.


Note:  In these photos you see a pale blue stencil being used.  This is an advance prototype sent to designers at StencilGirlProducts.  When you order your own stencils, they will be white.

Next, I used a plastic artist's spatula to spread thick white metallic paint thru each of the stencils.  

ABOVE:  A CLOSE-UP OF THE WHITE METALLIC PAINT STILL HELD ONTO THE CARD COVER WITH GREEN MASKING TAPE (AT TOP OF PHOTO.)
 While the paint was still wet, and while the stencil was still in place, I sprayed one of the cards with a water-based paint.  Keeping the stencil in place during the spraying step is important to prevent the spray paint from landing on areas where I didn't want spray to land.  See below:


Quickly but gently, I lifted off the stencil and -- since I had used thick paint -- I cleaned the stencil.  (When I use thin media, I seldom bother to clean a stencil after use.)

ABOVE:  A CLOSE-UP OF THE GREETING CARD COVER THAT WAS ALLOWED TO REMAIN WHITE; THE STENCIL HAS JUST BEEN LIFTED OFF.

Once the 2 greeting card surfaces had dried, I placed translucent resist paper over them, and got out my dimensional paints in squeeze bottles.  I used deli wrap paper, but plain wax paper would have worked.  

Holding the deli wrap in place with one hand, I used the other to start drawing lines along the lines of the stencil design.  I was careful to keep the dimensional paint flowing, leaving no gaps in the network of lines. 

When the dimensional paint had dried, I carefully lifted it off the resist paper, pulling the networked lines free just a little at a time.

I painted both greeting card covers with a coat of gloss gel medium.  While the medium was still wet, I placed a network of dimensional lines across the surface of each.  I used copper paint for the still-white card and yellow for the blue-sprayed card:

Click on the above image to better see the 3D lines made with dimensional paint from a squeeze bottle.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

CROP CIRCLES


Below is a ghost print made with one of my 3 June StencilClub Crop Circle stencils -- for its background, I used an old collage.  I call it a "ghost" because I pressed the still-wet stencil to the old collage as an afterthought, just to clean off the excess paint after having used the stencil in another project.


StencilClub members can still order the Crop Circle set; to become a member, just check out the right sidebar here:  www.stencilgirltalk.com.


I've worked on a number of stenciling projects over the last 5 weeks, but since I'm recovering from shoulder surgery, I can't take any photos yet.  It requires being able to lift both hands, to use either my phone or my camera.  That's beyond me, now.  But around mid-September, maybe sooner, I will be taking photos of these projects and posting them.

Monday, August 24, 2015

About the Tote Bags with my Designs at Pixels.com....


I haven't yet had time to poke around at Pixels.com to see if there is a way I can add a more helpful description of their merchandise bearing my designs.  As far as I know, Pixels.com doesn't provide this information on its own. 

Having ordered Pixels.com tote bags of my own, I can say this:  

The tote bag is made from sturdy polyester.  The fabric exterior is bonded with a layer of flexible plastic on the inside of the tote.  I suspect the inside is waterproof because it looks that way, but I haven't tested this to see. 
I've also ordered a T-shirt from Pixels.com and found the material to be of good quality -- not that cheap flimsy stuff that you sometimes find in some souvenoir shops.    

6'x6" GINGKO Stencil, used in a Recent Project ...




In taking another rewarding online workshop facilitated by Jane Davies, I had an assignment to do something in a monochromatic color scheme -- my least favorite scheme.  I floundered around for quite awhile, before my eye fell on an old Gelli Plate print that had not turned out well.  I had used my 6"X6' stencil Gingko --



-- and as you can see, the resulting blue print was anything but sharp; I have had trouble all along with the paint drying too fast on my Gelli Plates.  But I tried to improve this particular blue print by spraying it with droplets of monochromatic blue.  (You can better see this by clicking on the top image to enlarge it.)  

When this old print caught my eye, I decided in relief to use it as the basis for a new greeting card cover.  (My 6"X6" blank greeting cards come from JAM.)  

With deckle-cut Friskar scissors, I clipped off edges from the original print, before gluing it to the greeting card cover.  Then I added the cut-offs as narrow strips across the upper left of the card.  Below that, I added two more collage elements, blues in two shades, cut from old catalogs and calendar pages.

The final artwork is far from a masterpiece; I was happy enough to finally come up with something that meets the requirements of this segment of Jane's weekly assignment-list.  As many of us know, the words "masterpiece" and "workshop" go together like oil and water.  The goal of a workshop is to equip ourselves with knowledge that will serve us in the future.  

What I personally learned from this segment of an assignment is that I will most likely never choose a monochromatic color scheme for any of my artworks.  Others can pull this off beautifully ... and my hat is off to those artists!  :-)

Saturday, August 22, 2015

LABOR DAY WEEKEND 2015


You are cordially invited to attend St. George’s-by-the-River 4th Annual
                       Canterbury Art Show -- 

            A Tapestry of the Arts 2015 Art Show and Sale

*********All proceeds benefit St. George's and and the many local charitable organizations to which it contributes *************

 Friday, Saturday and Sunday     September 4, 5, and 6 
$10 general admission

For further information, visit

St. George’s church is located at 7 Lincoln Avenue, Rumson, NJ 07760

Thursday, August 6, 2015

Click on the Widget in the Upper Left ....


... to see some of my artwork, stencil-related and otherwise, available on T-shirts, tote bags; prints, greeting cards and many more options.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Visit www.StencilGirlTalk.com for this week's blog hop and giveaway!


Visit today's edition of StencilGirlTalk to join this week's StencilGirlProducts blog hop and giveaway!

In today's hop -- 

  http://sherrycheever.blogs.splitcoaststampers.com/2015/03/25/ken-oliver-crafts-and-stencil-girl-blog-hop/

-- another 9"X12" stencil of mine, Vintage Script, is being used  --

 
 This stencil is available here:

 http://www.stencilgirlproducts.com/stencil-script-vintage-cecilia-swatton-p/l267.htm

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Second Day of StencilGirl Giveaway Blog Hop!



 Today's Blog Hop includes artwork using my 9"X12" stencil Nosegay --


So join the fun here, and you may win in the giveaway --

http://www.marycnasser.com/blog/ken-oliver-stencilgirl-blog-hop

Monday, March 23, 2015

Don't Wait!


StencilGirl's blog hop starts today, so if you jump in quickly, you have a chance at winning prizes!

http://www.stencilgirltalk.com/2015/03/stencilgirl-and-ken-oliver-day-one.html

While visiting today's post by Ken Oliver, you can see how he used my 6"X6" stencil  Pressed Leaves.



Saturday, March 14, 2015

9"X12" Stencil TANGLED PODS


There are countless ways to use stencils -- for proof, scroll thru my other blog --

http://heartworkbycecilia.blogspot.com

But I often fall back on old favorite stenciling methods, including the use of a Sofft Sponge to apply heavy-body acrylic paint thru the openings.  I usually do this as a second step, having first established a background. Over the background below, I've used the stencil 9"X12" Tangled Pods with heavy-body burgundy acrylic.


After using the stencil a first time , I often add spray paint.  This reinforces the layered look that's already begun -- and it's useful for hiding areas where paint may have bled under the stencil.  I sometimes use Adirondack color wash spray from AmazonSmile.  Other times, I use a mix of liquid acrylic paint, water and airbursh medium in a spray mister bottle.  (Roughly 1 part paint, 1 part water and just a drop of the medium.)  I use the small spray bottles found in the travel section of drug stores.

My next step was to brush on new layers of blue acrylic paint to set the stage for spraying a thinner paint thru the stencil.  I don't always add these new, opaque layers, but in this case I decided to do it this way.

Below is a close-up of the stencil taped in place, ready for me to apply spray paint.  (Notice I have cut the outside border off the stencil -- now stained from having been used earlier with burgundy paint.)

Detail close-up

After spraying paint thru the stencil, I lifted the stencil, leaving what you see in the close-up below. 

Detail close-up
Another old favorite technique that I often fall back on is to use the reductive (also called subtractive) approach:  First, I paint a layer of new color in a limited area -- then, while this layer is still wet, I place a stencil over it.  Holding the stencil in place with one hand, I use a paper towel or soft cloth to rub off still-wet paint in the areas that are exposed in the openings of the stencil.  The results are shown below -- where I have used the reductive technique at left bottom (purple) and right bottom (aqua.)

Below is a detail close-up of the lower left side of this painting.


Next, I focused on the upper right area, again applying burgundy acrylic paint thru the stencil.  See below.


Below is a close-up of this upper right area:


 After the burgundy paint had dried, it was time once more to secure the stencil to the canvas with masking tape.  Notice again that I've cut off the stencil's outer border.  (You can click on the image below to enlarge it.  The stencil is now stained green.)




  Again I used water-thinned green acrylic paint in a mister bottle to spray thru the stencil.  After I lifted off the stencil, the central right area of the painting appeared as shown below.



Below is a close-up of this area:



Below is a full view of the painting, further developed.  What I've done was (1) I painted out the left-middle section with opaque green paint; (2) I applied full-strength pink paint thru the Tangled Pods stencil; (3) I weakened the lower part of this imprint by covering that area with green spray paint. 



Below is is the painting, finished.  The final touch was to add part of the cut-up stencil along the left side.  This meant cutting the stencil almost completely apart and reassembling it while collaging it to the canvas.


These are only a few ways I've found to use my 9"X12" stencil Tangled Pods. 

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

The Art-Making Tool Can become Artwork Itself


Joan Bess is the person I thank for launching in my head a new-to-me technique.  I loved the concept she introduced so much that I decided to take it one step farther.  Her recent post -- at http://gelliarts.blogspot.com -- demonstrates creating a textured paper to use both as a tool and as a final artwork, with the Gelli Plate.  Using a squeeze bottle of textured paint and a sheet of paper, Joan opted for a freehand-drawn approach to making this tool.  I decided to add another step, at the very start:

First, I used masking tape to secure my 9"X12" stencil Mimosa to a sheet of previously painted newsprint. Then I began to outline the design with a watercolor pencil --

Above shows the stencil in full.

The above close-up shows the blue outlines as they are being drawn around each part of the design, by tracing the open edges of the stencil.

Above: The stencil has been removed; the watercolor pencil lines remain.
Above:  The outlining with textured paint has begun.  It's just a matter of following the lines drawn with watercolor pencil.  I felt no need to be exactly faithful to each of those original lines.

Above:  The textured outlines have been completed; now comes an important step --
Waiting for that textured paint to fully dry.  Don't start printing with your Gelli Plate till you can raise your right hand and affirm on a Bible that the texture paint is DRY. 

Once I started printing with my Gelli Plate -- I used the 12" X 14" plate since my large Mimosa stencil measures 9"X12" -- the process was quick and easy.  With a brayer, I spread open acrylic paint over the plate, then pressed the textured paper face-down onto the wet paint.  When I pulled the paper up, it had collected some of the paint, and it had left an imprint.

I repeated this process several times with new layers of paint, continuing until I had pulled a number of prints. 

Having previously used the Gelli Plate with the Mimosa stencil itself -- not an outlined version created from the stencil -- I could immediately see the difference between the two in terms of results.  I'm pleased with the results I've achieved both the original way -- using the stencil itself -- and this new way.

Some of the "new-way" prints are shown below.

Above is one of the original new-way prints.

Above:  This version was made from the original green print, which I scanned into Photoshop and color-altered -- now, it will be printed out for use in an art journal alongside the original green print.



Likewise, the above pail blue print is the original pull.

And likewise, the purple version below was color-altered in Photoshop from a scan of the original pale blue print.


To show a comparison with the "old-way" Gelli Plate prints, created by using the stencil itself instead of a texture-outlined version, I'll include the images below --



For anyone puzzled by my term "the old way," I'm talking about brayering the Gelli Plate print with open acrylic, then placing an original stencil onto the plate.  The stencil is then lifted, leaving its imprint on the plate.  Next, a sheet of paper is pressed onto the plate, and pulled.  The above two images were achieved this way.  Variety is the spice of life!

Last but not least, here is the paper I had treated with texture paint.  This is how it appears now that it has been used multiple times with the Gelli Plate.  It was a tool, but now it's artwork :


My 9"X12" stencil Mimosa is available at www.StencilGirlProducts.com.
So is my 6"X6" Mimosa. Thanks for visiting!

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

TANGLED PODS -- 1 of 3 Just-Released Stencils at StencilGirlProducts.com

I'm trotting out this "stencil-and-scrape" technique once again; it remains a favorite way of mine to create translucent papers for my large collages on canvas.

This time, I'm using the technique with my new 9"X12" stencil Tangled Pods, available here: 

http://www.stencilgirlproducts.com/category-s/1832.htm

(Note:  In this demo, I'm using the blue prototype-stencil that's given to designers at STENCILGIRL(TM)Products.  When you order this stencil, however, it's made of translucent white plastic.)

Below is the stencil secured to the work surface with masking tape. 


The photo below shows a sheet of deli wrap taped over the stencil.  (In this demo, I started with deli wrap and later switched to white tissue paper.)




The photo above shows the way I place acrylic paint across the top of the paper.  On the far middle right is the old credit card I'll use for the scraping.

In the two photos below, I show the first scrape and the second scrape; the credit card has been pressed into the paint at the top of the tissue and scraped downward over the tissue, with enough pressure to capture the contours of the stencil openings. 


  
My next step was to set aside the scraped papers to dry.  While they dried, I taped another sheet of tissue atop the stencil and made rubbings, using water-soluble crayons.

ABOVE:  THE RUBBING HAS BEEN STARTED.

ABOVE:  THE RUBBING IS FINISHED.
Now came the need to make this rubbing waterproof, so it can later be used on one of my large collages on canvas.

The method of waterproofing I chose was to spread matte gel over the surface:





This, too, needed to be set aside to dry.

Below are the papers created with the stencil-and-scrape technique (with acrylic paint) --




 And below is the paper I made with water-soluble crayons; the matte gel has now dried, so the paper won't lose any color after being added to a collage on canvas.


 To see all three of my just-released stencils, just visit

http://www.stencilgirlproducts.com/category-s/1832.htm

Below are two collages on canvas made with these papers --