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Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Quick Prints with 4" x 4" Mini Stencils/Masks


Today I took a little time to make a handful of simple prints with my  mini stencils/masks R and E m268 and M and Y m267each 4" x 4".

The prints below took just minutes to create:


M and Y m267


R and E m268


M and Y m267


This was actually plain paper that I had placed under M and Y m267 to clean it! 

This sheet of cardstock is a background-to-be for a future project.  The stencil used in the upper right is M and Y m267.

Thank you for coming to see my blog today!  To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here.

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Pairing Mini Stencils/Masks with StencilGirl StencilClub May 2019 Stencil of the Month


After designing the 3-stencil set that made up the May 2019 StencilGirl StencilClub Stencil of the Month, I wanted to use that 3-piece collection with lots of other stencils and masks!  I started with my 4" x 4" mini stencils/masks R and E m268 and M and Y m267


R and E m268 paired with the 4" x 4" stencil in the May 2019 Stencil of the Month


R and E m268 along with M and Y m267 , used over a print made with the_9" x 12" stencil in the
  May 2019 Stencil of the Month


M and Y m267 and the_6" x 6" stencil from the 3-piece set of
  May 2019 Stencil of the Month


R and E m268 along with M and Y m267 and the_6" x 6" stencil from the 3-part 
  May 2019 Stencil of the Month

Here, prints made with 2 stencils in the May 2019 set are hiding mostly in the background, but peeking thru the white paint. R and E m268 paired with M and Y m267 in developing the top layer.

My sincere gratitude to all who came here to visit today!  To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here.

Thursday, September 12, 2019

More Prints with 4" x 4" Set of Mini Stencils/Masks


 The photo below is a close-up of black cardstock that became background for spreading heavy-body matte gel medium thru a stencil using an old credit card.  After the gel had dried, I dry-brushed over the raised areas with silver metallic acrylic paint.  In this blog post, I give step-by step photos and directions on the dry-brushing technique.





The 3-dimensional imprint above was made with M and Y (m267), one of my two 4" x 4" mini stencils/masks --

M and Y, measuring 4" x 4" (m267)

R and E, measuring 4" x 4" (m268)


M and Y (m267) was also the stencil I chose for making the first two prints below:


The background was highly textured with several heavy body acrylic paints, mashed with an old credit card to form peaks and valleys.  After that had dried, I used M and Y with a mix of zinc white  (translucent) acrylic paint and Titanium White (opaque) acrylic paint.


Light magenta acrylic paint mixed with white molding paste, applied to dark blue cardstock.  Metallic gold crayon was added to two corners after the paint had dried.


R and E (m268) was the stencil/mask that I used in creating the two prints below:


Borders:  metallic crayon; print:  light magenta acrylic paint mixed with white molding paste.


Bottom layer:  gold metallic acrylic paint.  Top layer:  Titanium White (opaque) acrylic paint.

Many thanks for stopping here at my blog today!  To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here.

Sunday, September 8, 2019

Using Stencils to create the Look of Tiles


I've enjoyed creating some prints that I think of as "tile" prints.

Part of this "tile" look is developed by turning the stencils/masks in opposite directions in making each print.  This yields an impression of unity (because some designs match) yet, at the same time, variety (which ramps up interest for the viewer.)  

For the first "tile" below, I used both m268 R and E and m267 M and Y. (Its background is a pre-painted now-invalid stock certificate, a flea market purchase.)   




For the second "tile," I used m267 M and Y. (Its background is a sheet of foreign newsprint.)




The "tile" below combines prints from both m268 R and E and m267 M and Yas well as incorporating a background print made with my 9" x 12" stencil Clustered Leaves.  The prints were made with acrylic paints; the borders were added with crayon. 




Below is a piece that, to my eye, has a tile-like appearance, maybe because I've seen tiles used diagonally this way.  4" x 4" m268 R and E and m267 M and Y both were used.  Asemic writing was also used.







Above is today's final "tile," developed with acrylic paints on pre-painted foreign newsprint.  Again, 4" x 4" m268 R and E and m267 M and Y both were used.

Thanks for visiting today!  To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here.

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Thursday, September 5, 2019

Backgrounds for Print-Making with Stencils


Today's post trots out still more art samples created using my two brand-new StencilGirl stencils.  These minis of 4" x 4" each can also be called masks; in my opinion, that's what they actually are.   


M and Y, measuring 4" x 4" (m267)

R and E, measuring 4" x 4" (m268)


Using pre-printed backgrounds can add a jog of excitement to prints made with stencils.  Pre-printed background papers can certainly include papers you've prepared yourself.  But in this post I'll focus on using old picture calendar pages, old magazine picture pages and the like.

For starters, I've chosen flyleaf pages from old encyclopedias and other old books.  The photo below shows one of those flyleaf papers (originally printed with a pattern of marbled paper) ... it forms the background for this print created using m268 R and E .
  




Another "borrowed" background gives pizzazz to today's second print 
made with m268 R and E --





Below, a different flyleaf paper, also pre-printed with a marbled design, has been used with m267 M and Y.









Above is one more "borrowed" background that jazzes up this print 
made with m267 M and Y .

Thanks for visiting today!  To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here.

Monday, September 2, 2019

Using Stencil Prints with Asemic Writing


Today's post brings more art samples developed with my pair of new StencilGirl stencils -- each a mini of 4" x 4".  They could also be called masks; in my opinion, that's what they actually are.   


M and Y, measuring 4" x 4" (m267)

R and E, measuring 4" x 4" (m268)

I used both stencils in developing the image below.  My approach was, first, to make prints with acrylic paint on previously prepared paper; then, to use calligraphic marks to fill in all of the printed areas, except for the one on the lower right.  

In some areas, I came back to cover these calligraphic marks with more prints, using the same two mini stencils. 





I took a similar approach in creating the piece below; this time, I created a diamond-like background shape with the calligraphic marking itself.  Then I made multiple randomly placed prints with m268 (R and E), covering the diamond shape as well as the rest of the piece.  Do you notice how m268's prints resemble puzzle pieces?  Entirely unintended; but I like it.





M268 (R and E) was again the stencil/mask I chose to use in making the piece below --





StencilGirl StencilClub member Lisa Dobry gets all the credit for having encouraged me to try this calligraphic scribbling -- but she does it much better than I do.  Asemic writing is the title for this kind of scribble, which can be meaningless or can have actual (but often disguised) meaning.

I like pairing it with stencil prints because I can use them to create the basic shapes to fill in with my Sharpie white painting pen, which will write on just about any surface.  

To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here. To follow this blog by email, please use that option in the upper right sidebar.  Thanks for visiting here today!   

Friday, August 30, 2019

Introducing 4" x 4" Mini Stencils/Masks -- M & Y and R & E -- at StencilGirlProducts.com


These 4" x 4" relative newcomers could be called stencils or masks; the line dividing the definitions of these two labels is blurring, in today's jargon.  


My inspiration for these two designs -- M and Y alongside R and E -- arose from my long-held love for customizing letters of the alphabet.  Although these two minis were originally based on alphabetic letter combinations, they have evolved into abstract patterns. 


M & Y, measuring 4" x 4"

R & E, measuring 4" x 4"

Two photos launch today's post --





The first photo, above, shows the start of a new painting on stretched canvas.  The bottom layer was created using my 9" x 12" Winter Berries Mask.  After that first layer of acrylics had dried, I added a layer of translucent gold acrylic paint.  That two-part combination became foundation for this art adventure.  I used my just-released stencils several times, layer by layer, waiting for paint to dry between applications of layers.

The finished piece below -- you can click on the image to enlarge it and better see detail -- shows very little of the Winter Berries imprint, but it's there.  After deciding enough layers of the new stencils had been added, I covered the background areas around the canvas with a collection of acrylic paints.  Here the resulting background looks black, but in reality, it's a blend of dark purples, dark blues and dark magentas. 





On another stretched canvas, I started with Liquitex Black Lava medium, spreading it thru both new stencils with an old credit card.  After this first application of lava medium had dried, I used the stencils in the same way a few more times.  Also, I put the lava-laden stencils to work as stamps -- flipping them over to press the excess lava medium onto the canvas.  Immediately after using the lava medium each time, I dipped the stencils into a basin of water and wiped them clean with soft rags (old terrycloth washcloths work well.)  I don't usually clean my stencils, but whenever I use a 3-dimensional medium like lava medium, I clean stencils and masks to prevent their openings from getting clogged.





The final artwork above shows that I added acrylic paints and inks to the entire central area of the canvas, filling in the lava-prints and the areas around them.  

My next-to-last step was to develop the pale beige edges using the stencils, repeatedly sponging thru them with light shades of yellow, magenta and blue. 

Before calling the piece done, I lightly went over some of the raised lava prints with Krink Permanent Paint Sticks.  These are oil-based  jumbo-sized crayons.  Their color goes on wet but dries very quickly.  

Other companies make this kind of crayon; one is Sakura.  Another is Shiva.  However, the Shiva sticks that I've used have taken a long time to dry.  

Thanks for visiting here today!

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Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Layering with Stencils


So many ways to use stencils and/or stencil-prints in creating layers!

Below is a 6" x 6" greeting card layered with prints made with (1) Sassy Spray (bottom layer); (2) May 2019 StencilClub 4"x 4" stencil (center layer); and (3) a heart cut from a print made with Clustered Leaves (top layer.)




Incidentlly, I just happened across an online listing for Clustered Leaves -- which is certainly available at StencilGirl -- as being "unavailable" at PaperArtsy.  :-(  !!!

Below is an example of a different kind of layering.  All that I did here was to place my 9" x 12" stencil Garden Montage over an old page from a picture-calendar, then apply a layer of translucent purple acrylic paint....





Next, I'll show a close-up of a different approach to layering.  The first layer below was made with my 6" x 6" stencil Kaleid, which I placed on a sheet of matboard (a sturdy cardboard that comes in colors.  This matboard was a medium blue.)  

With an old credit card, I created the first layer by spreading heavy-body matte medium across the stencil.  I lifted the stencil off immediately.  While waiting for the matboard to dry, I dipped the stencil into water, before wiping off the matte medium with a dry rag  (old washcloths are great for this!)  Normally I don't clean stencils, but I do when I've used any 3-dimensional medium.  This prevents any permanent gunking-up that might obscure the stencil's details.

Once the matte medium on the matboard had dried, I rubbed its surface with a layer of yellow-orange Pan Pastel --  





The most popular way of layering with stencils is to apply layers of paint to an art journal page, a stretched canvas, or any other sturdy substrate.  Below is a close-up of an artwork-in-progress on stretched canvas.  Layers of paint (pale pink, pale yellow-green, etc.) form the background for this white print made with my 9" x 12" stencil Loopy Ladders.  (You can click on the image below to enlarge it and better see details.)  Because this is an unfinished piece of art, I already know that I will be adding still more layers of acrylic or watercolor to enrich the finished work.





Thank you for visiting my blog today!  To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here.

Saturday, August 24, 2019

FACETS 9" x 12" Stencil


One day, I made a series of prints with my 9" x 12" stencil Facets --






















What to do with these and all my other prints?  Below is a greeting card cover, first imprinted with a background of Facets.  Over that print, I did a second print using Mikki's Flowers Stencil (6" x 6").





(These flowers also come as Mikki's Flowers Mask, shown below....)





Below is an art journal double-page spread -- still being developed -- that features one print made with Facets , overlaid with a print from another 9" x 12" stencil, Mimosa.  And the central area has been imprinted with my 6" x 6" stencil Sprigs.





Many thanks for visiting this blog today!  To scroll thru the pages of my StencilGirl stencils and masks, please start here.