Friday, November 7, 2014

Stencil-and-Scrape Technique


"Stencil-and-scrape" is what I call this technique -- it's a wet version of dry rubbings, an old technique traditionally done with soft graphite, crayons or other soft, dry media.

I create a work surface by spreading freezer paper (shiny side up) and taping it down along the edges with masking tape.

The stencil goes down first; then, over it, I place a sheet of thin paper.  Here I'm using mulberry paper, thin enough to be translucent, yet strong enough to endure the scraping.


Next, I add a couple of "cousin" colors in acrylic paint --

ABOVE:  THE PAPER IS NOT YET COVERING THE ENTIRE STENCIL.  FOR THE NEXT STEP, IT WILL BE MOVED TO COVER THE STENCIL.
Using an old credit card, I scrape down across the paint, pressing the paper to the stencil underneath.  During this step, it's important to hold the paper and the stencil firmly in place.  You may find it helpful to use masking tape to secure the stencil and the paper to the work surface.  Click on the image below to enlarge it --


Below are 3 dried papers that have been printed using this technique:




The middle paper above was printed on deli wrap paper; the other two were printed on mulberry paper.  All of them will be cut to assorted sized for use in collage.

Stencils used here are available via this link --

http://www.artistcellar.com/stampstencil/acSignatureSeries.html

Thursday, November 6, 2014

ANNOUNCING WINNER OF FREE STENCILS


Announcing my Winner of Free Stencils! 

From the comments left on my blog post of Oct. 31, I've selected a winner --

******    JackieP Neal  ********

Congratulations!  Please leave another comment at the end of this post -- and this time, give your mailing address.  To preserve your privacy, I will delete your comment so that it will not appear in my blog.  But I need the information myself so that your free stencils can be mailed to you. 

PLEASE COMMENT BY NOVEMBER 8, OR I WILL HAVE TO PICK A DIFFERENT WINNER!

Here Comes the Technique from a Previous Preview...


My "stencil-and-stain" technique calls for
* Yupo (a white plastic sheet sold in art supply stores and online; it comes in tablets of different sizes)
* a watery/thin liquid paint -- liquid watercolor or acrylic inks or Golden High Flow acrylic paints
* a mister spray bottle filled with water.
Here is the step-by-step process:
(1)  Place layers of newspaper across your work area, in case some of the watery paint runs off the Yupo.
(2) After putting the Yupo in place, arrange the stencils any way you like across the sheet of Yupo -- see my example in the photo below.  The stains will happen where stencil openings and edges are touching the Yupo -- so make sure you have good contact; if needed, place paperweights atop the stencils to hold them to the Yupo surface.

(2) Add a few random drops of Golden High Flow acrylic paint or acrylic ink.  In my example shown below, I'm using Golden High Flow.  Other brands of high flow acrylics are available, also.  Golden is the only brand I've tried and I've liked the results.  Below, notice the small areas of liquid color -- one drop per stencil.  Click on the photo to enlarge it.

(3) Spray water gently across the surface to start the color spreading. In the photo below, I've placed the small mister bottle of water on its side, for it to show up better in the picture.  Notice how the original drops of liquid color have now begun to spread. 

(4) Repeat step 2 using a different color.
(5) Repeat step 3, spraying on more water as needed, to keep colors flowing.  Let the colors mingle on the edges.  But don't overdo the water-misting.  Too much color-mixing might give you "muddy" colors.  See the two photos below:

ABOVE:  THIS IS A CLOSE-UP OF ONE EDGE, SHOWING THE PAINT-WATER MIX SETTLING ALONG THE EDGES AND THE OPENINGS OF THE STENCILS.
(6) Without moving the Yupo or the stencils, allow the piece to start drying.

(7) Be careful to remove the stencils before the paint or ink has fully dried.  This might be about an hour, depending on the humidity of your area.  After the paint has started to dry, check to see if the stain has set yet, by gently lifting one corner of one stencil.  If the liquid color is still runny, more drying time is needed.

Below is the finished print, once the stencils have been lifted away and the paint has fully dried.  This is the image I showed in an earlier post, as a sneak-preview.  Click on the image to enlarge it.

Now, it's time for me to take the scissors to my Yupo print and chop it up to use in a collage.  Or an art-journal.  Or greeting cards ...

A warning:  If you use liquid watercolor, you won't have much (if any) trouble lifting the stencils off the Yupo if you accidentally let the liquid dry before removing the stencils.  However, if you use any high-flow acrylics or any other kind of acrylic product, I repeat that it's important to lift off the stencils before the liquid medium has fully dried.  You don't want the stencils sticking permanently to the Yupo!
 

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

This Technique Won't Crimp Your Style ...


Today's post goes further afield in exploring ways to use prints made with my 4-piece set of Kaleidoscope stencils --

http://www.artistcellar.com/stampstencil/acSignatureSeries.html
Shortly after God created dirt, He nudged someone to start making paper crimpers.  Okay, that's a slight exaggeration, but paper crimpers have been around for a long time -- I have one that's wooden, in addition to later plastic models. 
Type in "paper crimpers" at http://smile.amazon.com/
-- and you will find crimpers that create straight corrugated lines, wavy lines, bubbles, hearts, teddy bears, and lots more.
Crimpers give your printed papers dimension, creating raised areas.  This textured paper opens up a lot of new possibilities.  One of these is to "dry-brush" acrylic paint over the newly crimped areas -- keep scrolling down to see an example of this.
ABOVE:  MY OLDEST CRIMPER -- MADE OF WOOD.  THE PAPER IS BEING FED INTO THE CRIMPER AT THE FAR END.  AT THE NEAR END, IT'S EMERGING WITH CRIMPED TEXTURE.
ABOVE:  MY SECOND-OLDEST CRIMPER.  PAPER IS BEING FED INTO THIS CRIMPER AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PHOTO.  AT THE TOP, THE PAPER EMERGES WITH CRIMPED TEXTURE.  THESE CRIMPS ARE MORE NARROW THAN THE CRIMPS CREATED WITH THE WOODEN CRIMPER.
ABOVE:  ONE OF MY NEWER CRIMPERS -- IT CREATES A TEXTURE OF CIRCLES.


ABOVE:  PAPER IS BEING FED INTO THIS NEW CRIMPER FROM THE TOP.  THE BOTTOM OF THE PAPER (UNDER THE CRIMPER'S HANDLE) HAS JUST STARTED TO EMERGE, NOW CRIMPED TO HAVE TEXTURE.

ABOVE:  A GREEING CARD COVER WITH CRIMP-TEXTURED PAPER.

ABOVE:  THE SAME PAPER, SHOWN IN CLOSE-UP.

ABOVE:  ANOTHER PRINT, WHICH HAS BEEN CRIMPED WITH A DIAMOND-PATTERN CRIMPER.

ABOVE:  A CLOSE-UP OF THE SAME PAPER.


ABOVE:  PAPER THAT HAS GONE THRU THE CIRCLE-TEXTURE CRIMPER. 

ABOVE:  A CLOSE-UP OF THE SAME PAPER.  NOTE HOW THE CIRCLE-PATTERN CRIMP REPEATS THE CIRCLE DESIGN OF THE STENCIL.

ABOVE:  PAPER IS BEING RUN THRU A WAVY-LINE CRIMPER.  IT IS FEEDING INTO THE CRIMPER FROM THE TOP AND EMERGING, TEXTURED, AT THE BOTTOM.

ABOVE:  THE WAVY-TEXTURED PAPER.

ABOVE:  A CLOSE-UP OF THE SAME PAPER.
ABOVE:  THE DRY-BRUSH TECHNIQUE IS BEING USED TO HIGHLIGHT THE RAISED AREAS OF THIS CRIMPED PAPER.  THE BOTTOM HALF OF THE PAPER HAS BEEN DRY-BRUSHED.  THE TOP HALF OF THIS PAPER HASN'T BEEN DRY-BRUSHED YET.

ABOVE:  A CLOSE-UP OF THE DRY-BRUSHED CRIMPED PAPER.

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Announcing my Winner of Free Stencils!

Announcing my Winner of Free Stencils! 

From the comments left on my blog post of Oct. 31, I've selected a winner --

******    JackieP Neal  ********

Congratulations!  Please leave another comment at the end of this post, and this time, give your mailing address.  To preserve your privacy, I will delete your comment so that it will not appear in my blog.  But I need the information myself so that your free stencils can be mailed to you. 

Monday, November 3, 2014

Keepsake Boxes and Kaleidoscope Stencils!


In today's post, I want to show a another way of using papers printed with my brand-new, 4-piece set of Kaleidoscope stencils ...
Whether printed on the Gelli Arts plate or with sponge-topped daubers or with spray paints, the completed prints work great for origami and other kinds of paper-folding.
I'm no expert at origami -- but I can manage to fold a paper fan!
Ages ago, I bought a few square wooden boxes with hinged lids at a craft store.  I recently learned that these are still available at Jo Ann Fabrics and Crafts --

The main difference between those I bought long ago and the ones at Jo Ann is that mine came already painted.  Additionally, each of my pre-painted boxes came with a square of cardboard cut to fit into the recessed area on the lid.  (The company that created the boxes was Sudberry House in Old Lyme, Connecticut.  They were intended to be used for mounting and displaying needlework.) 
However, nearly any lidded box will do for this project.  The recessed lid is a nice touch, but not totally necessary.  Household spray paint from the hardware store will quickly paint an unpainted wooden box; and it's easy to measure the lid and cut a same-sized square of cardboard.
Above:  One of my pre-painted boxes, viewed from the top, along with the blue cardboard pre-cut to fit into the recessed lid; on top of that cardboard is a piece of paper printed with several Kaleidoscope stencils, one after another, in a variety of colors.  This paper was first shown in my Nov. 3 post.
Above:  Another Kaleidoscope-printed paper, cut to the right size and fan-folded.  Likewise, the above paper was shown before, in my post of Nov. 3.
Above:  A black-and-white photo of adhesive being added to the back of the fan-folded print.  The adhesive I used is Golden Heavy Gel Matte (Gloss would have worked, too.)  To the right is the cotton swab I used to apply the gel medium, touching it to each of the folds and to the bottom of the fan.  Click on the image to enlarge it -- notice at the bottom, far left, I've added a narrow strip of foil tape to hold the bottom of the fan together.
Above:  One of my finished fans, now adhered to the blue cardstock.
Above:  The same fan, seen from a different angle, now that it has been place into the recessed lid of the keepsake box.
Above:  The second fan, adhered to another cardboard square, now placed into the recessed lid of another keepsake box.
An upcoming post will dust off an old technique -- using paper crimpers to jazz up prints made with my 4-piece set of Kaleidoscope stencils, now available here:

 

Sunday, November 2, 2014

Gelli Plate, Stencils and Metallic Paints





Above is the front of a Christmas card made with metallic acrylic paints and a

Gelli Arts Plate ...
Anyone not yet familiar with this portable, flexible printing plate can learn more here --
Both Joan Bess (above) and YouTube have many videos showing how to use the Gelli Plate.  Joan's intro video is here --
For today's set of prints, I coated the Gelli Plate with soft gloss gel and metallic acrylic paints:  I used a rubber brayer to blend the two paints, making multiple strokes across the Gelli plate.  (Hard rubber brayers -- not soft sponge brayers -- are needed for this step.) 
To make the most of the metallics, I used dark blue mulberry paper as well as cardstock of the same color. 
Above: Mulberry paper is more fragile than cardstock, but it took the metallic paint just as well as the cardstock shown at the top of this post.

Above:  I used a red-tinted metallic paint to create the top print; to make the bottom print, I used copper acrylic paint (with some red-tinted metallic acrylic paint.)
Above:  a variety of metallic paints -- including green -- were used to make the above prints on cardstock.
These 4 brand-new 6"X6" stencils are available here:

 
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 








 
 

 

 


Saturday, November 1, 2014

Pre-Printed Papers Speed Projects from Start to Finish


Welcome, all!  It's Day 2 of this series of posts using the stencils shown below:



100 - Trillium
101 - Sunflower

102 - Black Orchid

103 - Lily
 To quickly and easily build a complex image -- for greeting cards and art journal pages -- I like to use pre-printed papers.  These include old calendar pages, sheet music, magazine pages, foreign newsprint, old maps, catalog pages and earlier Gelli Plate prints that needed a little more pizzazz.

This colorful catalog page makes a great starting point with a nice variety of colors and a striped pattern.
The step-by-step photos below were taken as I began to use a dollar-store wedge-shaped cosmetic sponge to lightly daub/pounce acrylic paint thru stencils; my printing surface was an old calendar page.
(A short video of this daubing/pouncing technique done by Chris Cozen is here -- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EkPB6KWe0U   )

Above:  Step 1


Above:  Step 2

Above:  Step 3
After the first 3 steps, I continued placing different stencils from the series onto the first-stage prints, then the second-stage prints, and so on.  I continued to use cosmetic sponges to add layer upon layer, each in a different color.

These 4 Kaleidoscope stencils are perfect for layering over one another --  the kaleidoscopic format shows you the perfect dead-center every time you place a stencil over earlier printed layers.  This feature allows the artist to print exactly over the previous print(s) -- or kitty-cornered to them --
 
 








 
In creating the papers shown above, I made multiple prints, allowing drying time between each. 
The final prints are ready to be glued into readymade art journals -- or they can be folded and bound into handmade art journals. 
Two ways that I, personally, use them is to cut them up for use in large collages (artwork to hang on the wall) and collaged greeting card covers like the one below. 
 
I also use these brightly decorated papers as gift-wrap and gift-tags --

Above:  the bottom of a giftwrapped package.

Above:  the top of the same package.

Above:  the gift-tag, cut from a different multi-print.

Above:  The final gift, with gift-tag and bow.
In days to come, I'll show many more ways to use prints created with these just-released Kaleidoscope stencils.  Again, this Signature Series of four 6"X6" stencils is available here:
http://www.artistcellar.com/stampstencil/acSignatureSeries.html

Stay tuned for Day 3 -- coming very soon!  Meanwhile, here is a sneak peak at a print that will be described step-by-step in one of my upcoming posts --